Revisiting a trio of topics

........................................................................................................................................................................................

Recent events remind that I’m already overdue for revisiting some of my favorite topics from past columns.

 

 

Let’s start with the opening of Socorro’s newest fast food joint, the Subway on California Street.

Well, it’s not literally on California Street, but it’s pretty close. All that separates the entrance from the curb is a sidewalk.

When Subway opened earlier this month, the line was out the door.

First State Bank’s Holm Bursum IV, familiarly known as “Cuatro,” said at last week’s Rotary Club meeting that Socorro’s Subway was No. 1 in New Mexico the first full week it was open.

It was obvious, Socorro was hungry for a sandwich shop.

The novelty is beginning to wear off. Business is still brisk, but lines don’t go out the door so much anymore.

You may remember, I lamented in this column when KFC shut down, in 2008, and left Socorroans with one less fast food option.

Then, last year, Heart Healthy closed at the location where the old Subway used to be and left a void for fast food on California as wide as the San Joaquin Valley — or at least from the Taco Bell to the Blake’s Lotaburger.

So recovery from the fast food downturn I was so concerned about could be under way now that Subway’s here.

Unfortunately, there’s no drive-up window, although that could be easily corrected by moving the entrance to the east side and taking out the sidewalk to make room for a drive-up lane.

There’s also an update on the speed bump front. One of the first things New Mexico Tech students learned when they returned to classes was that the speed hump on Olive Lane has been bolstered, as if the hump were pumped up on steroids.

I decided to do some investigative reporting on this matter. I queried NMT spokesman Thom Guengerich on the subject, but he couldn’t tell me much. He said all he knew was that they bumped up the hump during the holiday break, probably as a deterrent to keep objects in motion from traveling down Olive Lane at an unsafe velocity.

My investigation led me to Yvonne Manzano-Brown with Tech’s facility management, who told me the hump was bumped up only about an inch or two.

I should have asked about slope and gradient, because Tech’s hump is now on par with some of the biggest speed bumps in town. I can tell by how much the golf clubs in the trunk rattle when I override the obstacle.

My investigation also revealed there are more speed bumps in town than I initially thought.

I’ve stumbled across two more on Bursum, north of Bullock, and one on Mt. Carmel, south of School of Mines Road, which brings the unofficial total of speed bumps on city streets to 17. That’s not counting humps in parking lots, the dip on Leroy that acts as an inverse speed hump and a quarter-mile stretch of Newberry.

I can think of no other city with more speed bumps per capita than Socorro.

The investigation will continue.

Finally, there’s my hair. It’s time to get another haircut … or not.

I’ve been thinking about it but haven’t decided. But it’s getting to be decision time … or not.

Interestingly, last weekend I got two unsolicited opposing opinions on the matter. There’s no telling what I’ll do.

So I’m split on the hair thing, stumped about the humps and can’t think of a better sign of economic recovery in Socorro than the one hanging on the side of that new building on California Street — or almost on California Street.

I may have to revisit these topics again.

 

T.S. Last is general manager of El Defensor Chieftain.

 


Contact