Letters to the Editor (12/24/2011)

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Cap’s toy run was a success
Editor:
I would like to thank all of the people who were instrumental in making the Capitol Bar’s 6th Annual Christmas Toy Run a success — Probate Judge Carlos Carillo, Rachel Padilla, Adam Ware, Charm Martinez, Sissy Olney, Rudy Lucero, Terry and Henry Rosas.
These individuals meet throughout the year, planning the event with the sole purpose of bringing Christmas cheer to the some of the neediest children and families in our community. Thanks to all the riders and others who participated and donated toys and money for the kids especially the United Mine Workers of America Local 3106, Gambles and El Defensor Chieftain for the advertisements.
And a special thank you to this year’s Santa, County Commissioner Danny Monette, whose laugh and all around good nature made for a very merry toy run.
Joanna DeBrine
Co-owner, Capitol Bar

Rain or shine, we need our mail
Editor:
The U.S. government insists the Postal Service be self-supporting. If mail delivery isn’t capable of sustaining itself, the Congress in Washington, DC, keeps cutting back services to the American people so that we’ll feel compelled to pay UPS or Fedex fees in double-digit amounts in order to send mail. Who’s going to benefit from that? Congress members who use the US Mail for free? Who have stock in UPS?
The US Mail is the single most advantageous factor in the history of America’s growth. Communication, commerce, and finance have grown to the present only because the Post Office delivered. Now, with the advent of electronic media, we see a variety of possibilities for exchange of information without using the mail. That doesn’t eliminate the need for Postal Service. Printed pages are still necessary and, in many cases, irreplaceable.
Why single out the Postal Service for “paying its way”? There are numerous agencies in the federal government that I can think would be easier to replace if they don’t start showing a profit. At least, breaking even. The Dept. of Defense comes readily to mind.
Our military has the kind of weaponry, personnel, and logistical capabilities that would allow them to go around the world extracting resources, assets, and promissory notes from countries requiring support or defenses. Instead of demanding the lion’s share of the national budget so that we might create more generals with conquest-complexes, let’s get some return on that military investment. We already shut down a substantial part of NASA for not paying the traffic.
The Coast Guard could make big bucks rescuing unfortunates from the water. The FBI could bill big-time for it’s investigative capabilities and use of its resources. The Dept. of Education could … no, let’s skip that one. You see what is possible, right?
One agency we could eliminate for no “rate of return” whatsoever is the Congress itself. Talk about not carrying its own weight! These layabouts have squandered every opportunity to get the job done for years. And, they continue to suck up evermore resources for themselves!
Here’s what we do: At year’s-end, whatever the cost overruns for operating mail service at the Postal Service, each member of the Senate and the House of Representatives is billed an equal share, which must be paid by that member’s state or the member himself/herself. If the member doesn’t pay up, his/her position is eliminated and the Congress gets “consolidated” into the remaining members. How’s that? I doubt we’d miss them.
The US Postal Service is too essential to be “consolidated” to centers where the costs are lower. Say, Juarez, Mexico, for New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, Oklahoma, and California. Taiwan for Arkansas, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and Montana.
We can do better. Let’s just keep in sight the return on investment/benefit to the American people ratio. We need mail delivery. Prompt, reliable, daily. Whether rain or shine.
 Herbert Myers
Socorro

An update and an explanation
Editor:
First, I would like to thank you for the honor of serving as your State Representative. Today, I would like to give you a brief update about the legislative committee news. Last week there was an intensive meeting of the Legislative Finance Committee dealing with everything from early childhood education to General Obligation bonds for the whole state.
During these challenging economic times my fellow committee members and I are striving to prioritize and maintain these and many issues. Currently, we are anticipating a small increase in revenue, which will greatly help these critical areas.
In the midst of all this, my office was able to get out our 2012 calendars to the entire 49th district. Unfortunately, in the midst of the rush we sent the same Valencia county letter to the Socorro area. While that is somewhat embarrassing, I would like to reassure everyone in Socorro that currently nothing has changed in the redistricting process.
I still have Socorro, Catron and Valencia counties and I will always remain available to you to represent your concerns in the Legislature. I urge you to contact me with those concerns and your ideas as we move toward the January session and hopefully a great 2012. In the meantime, thank you again for the honor of serving as your State Representative and you have my best wishes to you for a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
Don Tripp
Socorro