Myths as body conflicts

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The world of men and women, it seems, is fueled by its myths. A myth is not fictional as such, but is rather a set of stories, customs, and the like, that give meaning and direction to our lives. Whether historically accurate or not is unimportant. What counts is its meaning.

Myth oracle Joseph Campbell said that myths manifest in symbolic form the energies of the organs of the body in conflict with one another. Now add to that amazing statement what Lama Anagarika Govinda says, namely, that to the enlightened person, whose consciousness embraces the universe, the universe itself becomes his body.

With that, we are ready for the myth that has emerged in today’s world. It indeed manifests the energies of the body, but its extent is the universe of human activity. And so the tale begins.

It was in the days of kings—or rather of the Empire that lay between the Atlantis and the Pacifici, when the Sovietskis had fallen and the Reaganites had claimed their exalted place like a light shining on a high hill. The land was soon claimed by the Bushmen, who had risen in the sprawling plains of Texmex, but whose real origin was Texaco.

The scepter was snatched in the name of government’s brain and nerve. But it soon became clear that GW of the Bushmen was serving the hormones of business and industry. The muscles of Pentagon and Haliburton soon flexed in response to viral attacks against its system, and the Bushmen unleashed its raw skeletal power against the very brain and nervous energy it chose to avoid.

As they rode the ridges of combat and valor, they carried the banners of reproduction, proclaiming that democracy itself could be replicated in foreign lands with disparate histories. Lungs inflated and digestion accelerated as, despite the assaults of war, the Bushmen and their cohorts fattened their tissues while ignoring the defenses of white cells and lympathic chores to regulate abuse.

With little warning, metabolism stopped taking orders from this inflated condition, and heart stopped pumping, bones and ligaments stopped supporting, and lungs deflated in a meltdown that defied even the wisdom of the body itself.

Yet all the while a black steed was approaching, and as the Bushmen retreated, young blood and fresh breath signaled the arrival of Obamania, which rode the crest of renewed coronary inputs and the revitalization of the bones and cartilages throughout the body politic. Lungs inflated, as brain and nerves sought to restore proper function, and lymphatics sought to absorb and defend in the organism at large.

It wasn’t long, though, before digestion took in and, indeed, inflated with unwanted waste from the past. Excretion slowed and systems delayed, as efforts to restore vital functioning seemed to fail by the excesses of prior miscues. Could Obamania be re-tooled and the systems return to the promise on whose crest they’d arrived?

At once appeared hormones that pledged a new day, as Romneyites sought to restore function by the mere elimination of Obama tissue—a urinary excretion that alleged it would somehow achieve growth, as well. Which system would prevail, and would the body survive? A stethoscope reading might help one to know, but the most agile brain and the body system at its best need time’s delay to enlighten the day.

All of that will soon come to pass. The myth will reveal what history achieves—or does not. The body will survive, else its systems decay and a new story emerge.

Kozeny has worked as a teacher, counselor, and in pastoral ministry. He can be reached by e-mail to tko-z@sdc.org.