Socorro poems featured in New Mexico Centennial event

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At least two poems featuring Socorro will be posted on the 200 New Mexico Poems website, an official New Mexico centennial event facilitated and edited by Lisa Hase-Jackson, a poet and writing instructor at Central New Mexico college and UNM-Valencia Campus.

Danny Bowman, who grew up in Lemitar and attended Socorro elementary and middle schools, will have his poem “Bruce King’s Chickens” posted on the website Sept. 24.

Bowman exhibited meat chickens at the Socorro County Fair and New Mexico State Fair when he was a Tumbleweed 4-H club member. He sold three of his champion Lemitar-raised chickens to former New Mexico Gov. Bruce King at the state fair auction in 2001.

Bowman, now a graduate student in seismology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, writes fiction and poetry when he can. He and co-author Sarah Paige Berling are working on a novel, “Forgive Me if I Sleep.” Bowman describes it as a post-apocalyptic journey through the Southwest. Bowman and Berling, now a senior creative writing major at the University of Central Oklahoma, both attended Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn.

Another Socorro-related submission is “Socorro Strewn with Pumpkins.”

“It was written by a woman who calls herself Kathamann,” said Hase-Jackson. “She only states that she has significant ties with the New Mexico art community. It is unknown what city she was raised in or resides.

“While I publish each poet’s bio with their poem and have kept track of whether or not they live in New Mexico, I have not been keeping track of what city they are from,” she said.

Hase-Jackson modeled the New Mexico project after “150 Kansas Poems,” a web poetry project created and facilitated by Kansas poet laureate Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg. The poetry posted on the Kansas website was later published as the print anthology “Begin Again,” now available from Amazon. Hase-Jackson also hopes to find a print publisher for the 200 New Mexico Poems project.

Hase-Jackson will select a few poems a week to post on the website until the end of November, when all of the poems will be available to readers.

To access the poetry, visit http://200newmexicopoems.wordpress.com/.