Photographer goes for intimate landscapes

........................................................................................................................................................................................

Photographer Don Boyd tries to create a new outlook with his photos and brings them to life in an intimate way.

Submitted Photo: Photographer Don Boyd’s photo “Clearing Storm Light” was taken at the Bosque del Apache in October 2010. The photo is on a high-gloss aluminum surface to make the photo stand out more.

Boyd photographs nature, fine art, landscape images and images from the local area, such as the San Miguel Mission and a Madonna statue that was once in a nicho on the wall at San Miguel.

In photography, Boyd said, the photographer has to decide what he or she has to leave out before taking the picture. Photography can reflect the human condition and allow people to have a human response to what they see, he said.

“Photography is something I always admired,” Boyd said. “Taking the image is only a part of the challenge.”

He started photography 10 years ago and at the time he was exclusively doing conflict management training and consulting, which he continues to do.

But Boyd felt like he was missing a part of himself, he said. One of Boyd’s goals is to help people love the natural world. In his photos, composition is key and he likes the experiences people have with each one.

He began his photography career using medium and large format film cameras, and recently switched to a digital camera to capture his images.

Boyd does almost all of his own printing at his home studio. He prints the images on different surfaces. He has to make an artistic decision about what to print the image on, such as a pre-coated aluminum sheet that has a glass-like surface to make the photo stand out more.

Boyd uses silk, aluminum and water color paper to lend texture to the photos.

“I love being outdoors, and I have a strong emotional response to the natural world,” Boyd said. “I want people to see in my images what I felt, and what I am communicating is that emotional response to nature.”

Boyd worked at International Business Machines in San Jose, Calif., and Deborah Caldwell hired him to do leadership training in California. Eventually they got married, he said. They lived in Tuscon, Ariz., for eight years and in Las Cruces for six years.

Caldwell is the daughter of Michael Harriet and Alice Duquet from Socorro. Boyd and Caldwell moved to Socorro 2 1/2 years ago.

“What I love about photographic art is that the ah-ha experience happens inside of you, and that creates an emotional attachment and an intimate experience,” Boyd said. He suggests people interpret the word “intimacy” as “in-to-me-see.”

“I know myself better as a result of seeing an image,” Boyd said. “The experience is inside of me.”

Boyd’s inspirations are Ansel Adams and Eliot Porter.

Boyd has moved from iconic photography toward more intimate photography with landscapes, he said. With iconic landscape photographs people recognize locations. With an intimate landscape photograph, an emotional response is evoked even if they don’t recognize the place, he said.

“A good photograph will take you into the picture,” Boyd said. “Every good image has a focal point that will allow you to go more deeply. A good photograph isn’t still.

It will keep you entertained.”