Remote New Mexico journey follows a dark snowy river

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“The Most Remote Place on Earth: The Exploration of Snowy River Passage in Fort Stanton Cave” presented by Mike Bilbo, cave specialist with the Bureau of Land Management, on Feb. 23, 10:30 a.m. to noon. More than 10 miles in length, Snowy River was discovered in 2001 and is the longest known cave formation. It is said that surveyors at the far end of the cave are considered to be at the most remote place on earth. With stunning underground photography, the presentation will cover the history of Fort Stanton Cave exploration, cave geology and the effect of white-nose syndrome on bats and recreational caving.

Daily admission charges into El Camino Real International Heritage Center will apply the day of presentation. Single adult daily admission is $5. Admission is free for ages 16 and under, as well as for MNM Foundation members, U.S. veterans and Cultural Pass holders. Seating is limited in the lecture auditorium and on a first-come, first-served basis.

For limited front row reserved seating, call the center’s gift shop at (575) 854-3679 in advance with a $10 donation to El Camino Real Foundation. For additional information regarding this event, call (575) 854-3600.

 

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