City egg hunt: New format, same fun

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City of Socorro Youth Center director Cindy Rivera and her staff have filled 9,000 plastic Easter eggs with treats in anticipation of this Saturday’s Easter egg hunt at the Sedillo Park baseball diamonds.

File photo: Children run out into the field looking for colored eggs at the Sedillo Park 2012 Easter Egg Hunt.

Children ages 2 to 12, and their parents, should plan to be at the park no later than 9:15 a.m., Rivera said. The hunt begins promptly at 9:30 a.m.

The Easter Bunny will be on hand to pose with children if parents want to snap a photograph, Rivera said.

This year, some children will pick up lucky eggs entitling them to different prizes, she said. No one knows which eggs are the lucky ones, not even the youth center staff. Children will have to wait until the end of Saturday’s hunt for an announcement identifying the lucky eggs.

Unlike years past, there will be no hidden tickets, so Rivera said children should not stop to open the plastic eggs.

Previously, some eggs contained tickets children could trade in for Easter baskets filled with candy. Last year, they gave away 100 Easter baskets, but Rivera said she wanted to try something different this year. This year, all eggs contain a small candy treat, but having a lucky egg will entitle the child to a separate special prize: a stuffed toy, one or more city pool passes, a coupon for a free drink at the pool concession, or a bag filled with chocolates made by Debra Chavez, owner of Favor-it Things.

“Debra donated $100 worth of chocolates to match the city’s ($100 cash) contribution,” Rivera said.

Children will be divided into three groups according to age and assigned to different baseball diamonds, Rivera said. Only parents of the youngest children will be allowed on the field, and children the only ones permitted to pick up eggs from the grass.

“Children, not parents, are supposed to be gathering eggs,” Rivera said.

The Easter egg hunt is a popular Socorro tradition.

“Last year we had at least 1,000 kids,” Rivera said.

Even though she has put on the event for “at least 10 years,” Rivera doesn’t mind the effort.

“I love it,” she said. “Anything you do with the kids is great.”