Local brew to return to Socorro

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A new brewery and eatery headed by a familiar local brewer and restaurant manager is slated for the old Baca House on Abeyta Street, the original home of Socorro Springs Brewery.
Twisted Chile Brewery, owned and operated by K. C. McFadden and his family, is scheduled to open between mid-July and early August, bringing locally brewed beers back to Socorro. The restaurant will also serve wood-oven pizzas, calzones and stromboli, as well as casual menu items. Open-faced burgers prepared in the wood oven among other rotating specials will be featured.
“I want to keep it simple and the prices reasonable,” he said.
Live music lovers will be happy to learn McFadden plans to keep the music going on the stage weekends, and sports aficionados will be pleased that the Socorro tradition of watching live games on television while seated at the copper-clad bar will continue, with another monitor or two added for their viewing pleasure.
McFadden brings nine years of brewing experience to the venture.
He was one of the brewers at his sister and brother-in-law’s Socorro Springs Brewery when it opened at the Baca House in 2000. For the past few years, he has managed the Socorro Springs restaurant at its new location on California Street, but longed to run his own establishment and get back to brewing. He started searching for venues when he heard the Baca House was a possibility.
“When I found out from talk around town that the Bistro was closing, I called (building owner) Don Tripp’s son-in-law Lonnie Gonzales and told him I wanted to be next,” McFadden said. “I love being back in my building and getting back to brewing. It feels like coming home.”
McFadden is ordering brewing equipment, and plans to re-introduce quality local brews to the community.
“For nine years, we brewed award-winning lagers and ales using Socorro water,” he said.
The local water is great, he said, but he plans to install a “very small” reverse-osmosis system specially designed for breweries.
“The only problem (here) is chlorine,” he said.
The system will not alter the characteristic taste Socorro water lends to beer, he said.
McFadden has called Socorro home since 1987, when his father accepted a position doing weapons testing and analysis at New Mexico Tech with the Terminal Effects Research and Analysis group (now EMRTC), bringing then 18-year-old K.C. and the family here from the Phoenix area. K.C. and his wife Stephanie have home schooled their six children at their residence in the northeast section of Socorro. His sons Branden and Aaron and daughter Crystal will be helping out with the business.